Drunken Goat

Have you ever heard of the cheese “Drunken Goat”?

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Murcian cheesemakers invented this cheese in 1986 in an attempt to create a distinct regional cheese with big commercial potential. The cheesemakers took a traditional local goat cheese and bathed it in the local Doble Pasta red wine for 3 days. The result was an unqualified success both commercially and gastronomically and has brought attention and capital to that region. Aged for roughly 75 days, this semisoft cheese has a sweet, smooth flavor. The rind has an attractive violet color.  We purchased a wedge from Adams in 2010 ago when we tasting all the artisan cheeses selling in the local stores.  Last year some of the staff at Cornwall Wines encouraged us to make it.

Well, today we did and in about two months, we’ll taste it and see how it came out.  Maybe we’ll have a tasting at Cornwall Wines and pair it with some nice red wines?

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Here is the goat cheese and wine before soaking.

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Here is each cheese in a ziplock bag surrounded by the wine bath.

We will flip each one as many times as we can over the next 24 hours.  Each cheese comes out to dry for 24 hours and then goes back into the wine bath for 48 hours and then out to dry for 24 hours.  Then we will vacuum pack and age the cheeses for four to six weeks in our bloomy rind “cave” which is set at 50 degrees.

Chris at Cornwall Wines suggested we call it “Buzzed Goat.”  What do you think?

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One Response to “Drunken Goat”

  1. Melodie Says:

    I like Buzzed Goat, but how about Drunken Caper (latin for goat)? It is catchy, no?

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